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Delish Products for Foodies We’re Craving Right Now

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Get your hands on these designy products for home chefs and champion eaters

1 Felt+Fat

Philadelphia ceramics company Felt+Fat (named for two of mid-20th-century artist Joseph Beuys’s favourite materials) specializes in Barragán-esque colours and eye-catching proportions. Its solid slipcast, hand-finished porcelain clay tableware – including these alluring espresso cups with disc handles and softly uneven surfaces – encourages discreet caresses. Espresso cups at Biscotteria Forno Cultura, Union Station. $25.

2 Konro Grill

Compact and neat, this Japanese yakitori grill looks like a stylish planter – but it’s revolutionary for reasons that have nothing to do with aesthetics. When used with binchotan charcoal, the ceramic-lined grill is nearly smokeless, meaning you can use it – practically, if not legally – on your condo balcony. Available at Knife, 803 Dundas St W. $210.

3 Bump Collection

Every piece in the Bump collection of borosilicate glass mouth-blown into graphite moulds is – you guessed it – defined by its bumps. The concept comes together best in the teapot, with its black lid bubbling out of its body, and a clear bent-rod handle recalling the laboratory implements that inspired the line. Tom Dixon teapot at Klaus, 300 King St E. $205.

Matty Matheson: A Cookbook by Abrams Books

The Viceland TV star and former Parts & Labour chef doesn’t promise his new cookbook will be an easy one: some of the recipes – like that for chow-chow pickles – take a few hours (if not a day) to make. But these largely Maritime dishes from his own past are put out there with a surprising amount of sentiment. Available at Indigo. $40 $35.

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Get a closer look at what you can expect to find in the 2024 New Builds Issue of Designlines Magazine

In the 2024 Spring/Summer Issue of Designlines, we focus on New Builds and “celebrate the profound impact of creating something new, not just as an architectural endeavour but as a testament to laying down roots and shaping the very essence of our city’s identity,” editor-in-chief Joseph Cicerone writes.

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