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Design Week Highlights: Batch 1

A round-up of our favourite finds from Day 1 of Design Week

By Arta Ghanbari

Design Week has officially kicked off. For Day 1, we headed to Ontario Crafts Council Gallery’s Hand & Machine and Offsite’s Festival Hub at Bosley to see the latest from some of our favourite local and international makers. Within the roster of familiar names were Toronto-based designers Derek McLeod and Joy Charbonneau, London-based designer Zachary Eastwood-Bloom, and Jonathan Sabine with a collection of futuristic pendants made from sand cast aluminum and moulded with 3-D printed nylon.

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On display at the OCC Gallery, the “Tufted Bench” by dynamic duo Joy Charbonneau and Derek McLeod is made of CNC-cut walnut to emulate tufted upholstery. The precision of CNC machining allowed for the local design stars and husband and wife team to sculpt the pillowy forms on the top piece out of a simple slab laminated together with planks, and cut to match the width of the tufts. Tagged by Tory Healy.
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The idea for Zachary Eastwood-Bloom’s computer-generated nylon vessels were born from a simple visit to the V & A Museum in London. Spotting a collection of vases and jugs from Ancient Greece behind a display case, he was fascinated by how the glass acted as a filter and distorted the structures as he tried to photograph them. Eastwood-Bloom used algorithms to transform his vision into digital information that could be 3-D printed and exhibited here. In fact, he’s never even touched them. At OCC Gallery. Tagged by Tory Healy.
Jonathan Sabine’s cluster of seven pendants are handmade from sand cast aluminum and moulded using 3-D printed nylon.  Though the lights themselves are beautiful, it is the moulds — displayed nearby — that impress the most. The pendants are created by pouring molten metal into different impressions in sand with the same computer-generated pattern.  Sabine computer-generated new forms and interior patterns and a 3D printer brought these to life in laser-sintered nylon.
Jonathan Sabine’s cluster of seven pendants are handmade from sand cast aluminum and moulded using 3-D printed nylon. Though the lights themselves are beautiful, it is the moulds — displayed nearby — that impress the most. The pendants are created by pouring molten metal into different impressions in sand with the same computer-generated pattern. Sabine computer-generated new forms and interior patterns and a 3D printer brought these to life in laser-sintered nylon.
Ceramic artist Andy Brayman’s “Cups” on display at Ontario Craft Council Gallery's Hand & Machine exhibit. The blue and white 3-D printed porcelain cups feature intricate motifs and decorations, which were created by capturing the movement of Brayman's fingertips and translating it into custom algorithms. Tagged by Tory Healy.
Ceramic artist Andy Brayman’s “Cups” on display at OCC Gallery’s Hand & Machine exhibit. The blue and white 3-D printed porcelain cups feature intricate motifs and decorations, which were created by capturing the movement of Brayman’s fingertips and translating it into custom algorithms. Tagged by Tory Healy.
Vancouver-based art studio Dear Human's Patchworked in Canada wall installation at the Bosley Festival Hub on Queen West. The 1200-ceramic-tile mosaic is made up of repurposed Portuguese materials, in which each square tile was rejuvenated to added custom gold-foil motifs in the shape of feathers. Once the exhibit is dismantled, the designers will distribute the tiles across Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, with a magnet and QR code at the back of each so that spotters can scan and learn the history and traces of each tile. Tagged by Tory Healy.
Vancouver-based art studio Dear Human’s Patchworked in Canada wall installation at the Bosley Festival Hub on Queen West. The 1200-ceramic-tile mosaic is made up of repurposed Portuguese materials, in which each square tile was rejuvenated to added custom gold-foil motifs in the shape of feathers. Once the exhibit is dismantled, the designers will distribute the tiles across Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, with a magnet and QR code at the back of each so that spotters can scan and learn the history and traces of each tile. Tagged by Tory Healy.

 


Categories: Toronto Design Week
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